Archive for the ‘campfire’ Category


This episode of the Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast gives you two campfire favorites for the price of one. (Well, the price is free so I guess that does not really matter.) One song and one skit. From two different troop Laughs For Lunch Shows. Yep, we are spanning the decades with this episode.

The first skit we call The Sleepwalker. It involves some Boy Scouts sitting around the campfire late at night, talking about the events of the day, when a sleepwalker walks up to them and takes stuff from them. They do not want to awaken the sleeper though because, “It is dangerous to wake up a sleepwalker. She’ll bring it back in the morning.” Oh yeah, that IS a girl who happens to be sleepwalking.

The second part is a Scouting favorite known as the Baby Bumblebee song. The Scouts had the audience participate in this song during the show. Unfortunately, we do not have any footage of the audience singing along. The boys do a great job, and the last line always gets a smile from me when I watch it.

You are invited to leave a comment here using the link below, at the iTunes Music Store, or at the PTC Media forums. Or drop me an email at webmaster@melrosetroop68.org. It really is great to hear what you think about the podcast videos.

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    I am sure that you have heard the story and sang about Little Bunny Foo Foo at some point in your time involved in Scouting. You may have even lead the song during a campfire or pack program. Cub Scouts love the song. Boy Scouts think it is cutesy. And adults groan at the punchline. But everyone agrees it is a classic song for a Scouting event.

    Now what happens to our bunny friend when some Boy Scouts decide to update his story? They give the song a harder beat. And they perform it in a (gasp!) rapping style. The result is a slightly new version of the song with a touch of comedy thrown in for good measure. The words are unchanged, but the melody may never be the same again. Be warned, this version may stick with you a while after watching it.

    Click here to DOWNLOAD this Podcast
    Subscribe to Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast through iTunes.
    or at http://feeds2.feedburner.com/melrosescoutingproductions
    Check out other Scouting podcasts at PTC Media.

    Please leave a comment using the link below, at the iTunes Music Store (were we could really use some more reviews), or at the PTC Media forums. Drop me an email at webmaster@melrosetroop68.org. It is great to hear what you think about these podcast videos.

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      Ah, the closing campfire program at summer camp. The final bit of fun and laughs. The place were awards are presented from a week of adventure. The last gathering of the campers and troops. And, if your troop is doing a skit or song, it could be the last time at camp for the Scouts to experience excitement or anxiety. Luckily, the Boy Scouts of Troop 68 have enough experience to fall more into the excitement group instead of the anxiety group.

      The four young Scouts of Troop 68 (the older ones were at Philmont this summer) threw around a few ideas during the week for a skit to do for the closing campfire. The Buckskin Staff of Many Point Scout Camp had encouraged each troop to come up with a song or skit for the program. My four Scouts finally decided on the Invisible Bench skit.

      Everything was fine, until Friday morning when the senior patrol leaders met with the camp’s program director and were told that skits should have a “Superheroes” theme to them. My Scouts went into a near panic mode. They did not know any Superhero skits. What could they do now?

      During the morning program and afternoon activities we threw around several ideas and finally decided on the Invisible Bench skit. Only it would now be the Invisible Plane skit. The boys would portray various Superheroes gathering to join Wonder Women on an adventure. They would wait in the invisible plane until she arrived. Various superheroes were chosen to be in the skit, along with a quick intro for each one. After a few practices we Scouts were ready to perform.

      The Scouts from Troop 68 were called down to do their skit during the middle of the program. I thought the boys did a good job, as did all the troops who did a skit. There was some impressive talent during this year’s program. And of course, I had my video camera there to record it so I could share some of it to you.

      This post to the Melrose Scouting Production Podcast features the Invisible Plane skit, and the Supersize skit done by another troop from the Central Minnesota Council. I have to apoligize about the lighting. It was getting pretty dark by the time the troops performed their skits. And for some reason my camera decided to “hiccup” a couple times at the start of the Invisible Plane skit. Recording Boy Scout functions can be frustrating at times.

      I invite you to leave a comment using the link below, or at the iTunes Music Store, or at the PTC Media forums. Drop me an email at webmaster@melrosetroop68.org. It really is great to hear what you think about the podcast videos.

      Click here to DOWNLOAD this Podcast
      Subscribe to Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast through iTunes.
      or at http://feeds.feedburner.com/melrosescoutingproductions
      Check out other Scouting podcasts at PTC Media.

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        When I was a Boy Scout I attended summer camp at Parker Scout Reservation in Central Minnesota. We ate our evening meals in a dining hall. Once the troops were seated, one of the staff members would get up in front of the troops and lead us in a song. The Hole In The Ground song was one of the songs I learned during those meals.

        The Hole In The Ground song is an audience participation song. The song leader sings a portion and the audience repeats it. Everyone joins in on the refrain. As the song continues it gets a lot longer and a whole lot faster. By the end of the song there are only a few people who will usually be able to keep up. It is a song that does require some practice if you plan to lead it.

        Here are the words to the refrain of the song:

        Refrain:
        Well, in the ground, there was a hole, The prettiest little hole, that you ever did see. Well, the hole’s in the ground and the green grass grew all around and around. And the green grass grew all around. (The refrain will get longer with each verse.)

        I invite you and your son(s) to watch this video posting to the Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast and let me know if you were able to keep up with the singers. Learn it and use it during your next campfire program.

        Please leave a comment here using the link below, at the iTunes Music Store, or at the PTC Media forums. Or drop me an email at webmaster@melrosetroop68.org. It is great to hear what you think about the podcast videos.

        Click here to DOWNLOAD this Podcast
        Subscribe to Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast through iTunes.
        or at http://feeds.feedburner.com/melrosescoutingproductions
        Check out the other Scouting podcasts at PTC Media.

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          The Boy Scouts of Troop 68 have been performing a little skit/song called Star Trekking since the mid-eighties. (See blog post from August 2, 2006) It has been quite popular with most campfire audiences. In 1990 (wow, eighteen years ago) the troop performed this skit on a local television station station. This video was taped by one of the parents, luckily. Two and a half years ago I placed the video online at YouTube for the world to see. Since then, the video has received over 39,000 views, and averages somewhere around 50-60 views per day.

          Well, it seems that several of this year’s Buckskin staff at Many Point Scout Camp has seen the video. Some more then once. One Friday, the last full day of camp, our camp commissioner visited our campsite and asked me if I was the one in the video that was on YouTube. I said I was and gave him a quick explanation how that all came about. He was grinning from ear to ear when he asked me to sign his cap, and then asked me if I would perform the skit with some of the camp’s staff during the Friday night closing campfire program. I agreed, but wondered when we would have time to practice. After all, the staff would be busy all day. He replied that I should meet them at the camp lodge at 9:00 that evening.

          The campfire was scheduled to start at 9:30 pm. Not much time to practice.

          I was at the lodge at 9:00, which was a one minute walk from our troop’s campsite. Only half of the staff that were to be a part of the skit were there. The rest showed up as they arrived from their program areas. Unfortunately, we did not really have much time to practice. In fact, all we had time to do was to choose who would play what roles, go over each person’s lines once, and practice the refrain. We did not even get to run through the song one time. This could be interesting, I thought to myself as I walked back to my campsite. Luckily, most of the participants had viewed the skit on YouTube and had a good idea how it was done.

          I brought my camcorder along to the campfire program and was able to find another staff member to record the skit. When the time came, I left my seat in the audience to join the staff at the side. As we walked out to center stage I could not help but think of the possibility of the train wreck that was about to occur. After all, we really had not practiced together.

          I did not have to worry. The staff came through with flying colors. And better yet, the hundreds of Scouts and adult leaders in the audience loved it. The cheering at the end of the skit was overwhelming. We had pulled it off, and pulled it off well.

          Once I returned home from summer camp I had a problem with the camcorder. It began eating my tapes. One of the tapes it tried eating was the one that had the footage of Star Trekking. I had promised the staff that I would put this video online for them to see. I needed that footage. I bought a new camcorder, and luckily was able to retrieve the video from the campfire program. In fact, I should be able to get a few podcasts from the footage. Unfortunately, the footage is pretty dark since it was filmed after sunset.

          So here is that video of Star Trekking, performed at the Many Point Scout Camp closing campfire program on July 18, 2008. This video is dedicated to the 2008 Buckskin camp staff, and to the camp’s Ranger Scott, who appears in that YouTube video.

          Please leave a comment here using the link below, at the iTunes Music Store, or at the PTC Media forums. Or drop me an email at webmaster@melrosetroop68.org. It really is great to hear what you think about the podcast videos.

          Click here to DOWNLOAD this Podcast
          Subscribe to Melrose Scouting Productions Podcast through iTunes.
          or at http://feeds.feedburner.com/melrosescoutingproductions
          Check out the other Scouting podcasts at PTC Media.

          Thanks for Sharing!

            The Boy Scouts of Melrose Troop 68 have had a lot of fun performing at campfires over the years. They have been doing it since attending summer camp at Crow Wing Scout Camp in 1981. Then in 1996, they began doing a yearly campfire-style show for the community that they call Laughs For Lunch.

            The performances have really improved over the years. During that first summer camp in 1981 the troop sang a country music song called Running Bear. The only change the troop made to the song was to substitute camp staff names for Running Bear and Little White Dove. We did nothing very fancy, just stood in front of the campfire and sang the song for the campers, but the Scouts loved it. I think we embarrassed the male staffer we picked on though, although the female staffer thought it was funny.

            The next year the Boy Scouts of Troop 68 wanted to do better. We rewrote the lyrics to The Battle of New Orleans, and created a song we called The Battle of Plenty Coup, named after our campsite at Crow Wing. Instead of a song about battling the British, our song was about battling the mosquitoes. The troop was invited to perform the song at the Friday night closing campfire. Imagine our surprise when we received a standing ovation! We were all grinning from ear to ear as we returned to our seats.

            The performing bug had bit us! We were determined to sing again at the closing campfire the next year. We wrote the Battle of Plenty Coup, Part 2. This time we battled the staff instead of the bugs. Once again, it was a hit with that week’s campers.

            During the following years we created more songs, and even developed a few skits. Our repotour began to grow. The troop began performing at camporees and other Scout gatherings. By the late 1980′s Troop 68 had become well know throughout the district and council.

            Scouts and other leaders began asking us for the words to the songs we created, and the scripts to the skits. When I began forming the idea for a troop website I thought this would present a great way to share these songs and skits with other units. I posted them into two categories. The first was our troop’s original songs and skits. The second included our favorites that we had picked up over the years.

            You can check out these songs and skits by going to our troop website at http://melrosetroop68.org/campfirestuff.html
            We also have a lot of songs and skits videotaped that can be seen at our troop’s video site:
            http://melrosetroop68.org/videos.html

            So tell me, does your troop (or pack) like to perform songs or skits at meetings or campfire programs? What are their favorites?

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              The 2008 Laughs For Lunch Show is now part of history. Once again the Boy Scouts of Troop 68 did a great job of performing skits and songs before a live audience. Approximately 70 people attended the show, including family members, friends, and even Scouts and adult leaders from neighboring communities.

              After our final practice Saturday afternoon, the troop gathered at my house for a supper of pizza and sodas before heading back to the school auditorium for the actual show. We even had enough free time to watch about fifteen minutes of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

              While we were in my basement family room eating pizza, I told the boys that I had heard that a Hollywood talent agent, who happened to be in St. Cloud, had heard about our show and was planning to come to Melrose and watch it. Of course, most of the older boys did not believe me, but the younger ones were not sure if I was telling the truth or not. After a few minutes, I confessed that I was kidding.

              As people arrived for the show, I noticed that the chairperson for this year’s Ripley Rendezvous, a council event held at the Camp Ripley National Guard Base in central Minnesota, had arrived to see the Scouts perform. She had emailed me earlier in the week to ask if the troop would be interested in doing a few skits and songs during the evening program at Ripley. I invited het to attend the show and see if this type of thing was what she was looking for.

              So, in a way, a talent scout was sitting in our audience, just not from Hollywood. I did inform the Boy Scouts about our special guest before we started the show, but once the curtains opened I do not think they gave it another thought.

              The Ripley chairperson came down to the stage after the show to chat with me. She was very pleased with the Scouts’ performance and would like them to be part of the Ripley program. I steered her to our senior patrol leader to discuss the matter with him. I am sure this will be a topic during our next patrol leader council meeting.

              It has been a few years since Troop 68 has performed at a council or district event. We do participate in the closing campfire program at summer camp, but the Ripley Rendezvous will have a much larger audience, two to three times that of summer camp, and ten times the size of the Laughs For Lunch crowd.

              Will the Boy Scouts be able to handle that? I know they can. A little more practice, along with a little more encouragement, and they will be able to perform for anyone. Even the president of the United States.

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                There is less then two weeks left to prepare for this year’s Laughs For Lunch Show, a community show put on by the Boy Scouts of Troop 68. (I have discovered that Scouts in some other countries call this type of show a “gang show”.) As the scoutmaster of the troop, I find myself in the position of producer and director.

                As the producer I work with other people to arrange the facilities, make sure we have the props and gear needed, and get the word out to community. I write the releases for the local newspapers and cable television stations. I also arrange to have the show videotaped to be broadcast over one of the local stations.

                My job as the director begins a month before the show when I meet with several Scouts to plan the show’s format. The boys will discuss dozens of songs and skits. Then they begin to narrow them down to the ones they think should be in this year’s production. Finally, they decide the actual agenda. My job is to keep them moving forward and on track, to answer questions they have, to explain new songs or skits, and get in one or two things I would like to see included. We plan the show similar to the way we plan our yearly program.

                As the director, things can get pretty interesting during practices. I have to try to keep the Scouts focused, which is always a challenge with teenagers. I also help the boys understand what needs to be done during the skit. That means I may be on stage acting out a skit or singing a song with the Scouts. I sometimes think the Scouts find me amusing when I am acting out the various roles.

                During the show I am backstage making sure the Scouts are ready to go out on stage when they need to. I will also find myself on stage introducing a skit or even performing with the boys. This year I will find myself on stage without the Scouts as I lead the audience in a wild version of the song Vista.

                I always enjoy working with the Boy Scouts as we prepare for the show. It is challenging. It can be a little stressful. But overall, it is always fun.

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